Jul 302012
 

In the previous part we developed a fake event store for our blogging application. This event store just kept all events in-memory, making it unsuitable for production use. But it did allow us to adapt our application to using an event store, and let us work out the details of the event store interface without having to worry about an actual persistence mechanism.

In this part we’ll develop an event store implementation on top of Redis, a key-value store with support for additional data structures (such as lists and hashes), publish/subscribe, and transactions. If you’re more interested in adding new application functionality, you can safely skip this part and go to part 4 – conflict resolution.

Continue reading »